Our Blog

How does wisdom tooth removal affect orthodontic care?

December 22nd, 2017

The purpose of braces and other forms of orthodontic treatment at Carpinello Orthodontics is to correct malocclusion, also known as crooked or crowded teeth, or “bad bites.” Past orthodontic practice dictated that wisdom teeth be removed, especially in cases of crowding.

The wisdom teeth are the last teeth to come in, and are officially known as the third molars. The teeth typically erupt, or break the surface of the skin, in young people between the ages of 13 and 20.

Sometimes, wisdom teeth are impacted. That means they cannot break through the gum tissue. This typically happens when the mouth or jaw is too small to accommodate the teeth. Impacted wisdom teeth can become infected, and some dentists and orthodontists may want to remove them as prophylaxis to prevent possible future infection.

Justification for removing wisdom teeth

Dr. Carpinello and Dr. Jarosh-Wolfe will tell you that in some cases, wisdom teeth attempt to come in the wrong way, either tilting in the jaw, or sideways. If the mouth is too small to accommodate these additional teeth, they inevitably become impacted. Swelling or infection of the gum flap above an impacted wisdom tooth may cause pain. The greatest danger is pericoronitis, a potentially dangerous infection that can occur in the gum area around an impacted wisdom tooth, or around a wisdom tooth that has erupted.

Orthodontists base their decision to remove wisdom teeth on each patient's individual circumstances. To learn more about the impact wisdom teeth have on orthodontic treatment, or to schedule a visit with Dr. Carpinello and Dr. Jarosh-Wolfe, please give us a call at our convenient Drexel Hill, Edgmont, and Newtown Square PA office!

Do I really need to wear my rubber bands with my braces?

December 15th, 2017

Most of our patients at Carpinello Orthodontics will need to wear rubber bands at some point during their orthodontic treatment. The main reason our patients are instructed to wear rubber bands is to correct their bite. If your teeth do not fit together properly, Dr. Carpinello and Dr. Jarosh-Wolfe will recommend that rubber bands be used. Dr. Carpinello and Dr. Jarosh-Wolfe may also recommend using rubber bands to close or open spaces.

Rubber bands are a critical part of your treatment, and wearing them as Dr. Carpinello and Dr. Jarosh-Wolfe and our team recommend will help move your teeth into the desired position. Dr. Carpinello and Dr. Jarosh-Wolfe may ask you to wear your rubber bands full time, meaning that they should only be taken out when you brush and floss your teeth three times a day. Other times, you may be asked to only wear them part-time, like only during the day or only during sleep.

If you still have any questions about orthodontic rubber bands, we invite you to give us a call or ask us during your next adjustment appointment. Remember, wearing rubber bands as prescribed by Dr. Carpinello and Dr. Jarosh-Wolfe is an important step during your treatment, and can reduce the time you have your braces. If you lose your rubber bands or run out, stop by our Drexel Hill, Edgmont, and Newtown Square PA office and pick up more!

A Helpful Site on Orthodontics

December 8th, 2017

As you are undergoing orthodontic treatment, our team at Carpinello Orthodontics would like to point you to a helpful website. Our friends at the American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) have lots of important information about everything relating to braces, including myths and facts of orthodontics, tips for a better orthodontic experience, and cool webisodes about orthodontics.

Check out AAO today and feel free to contact us at our Drexel Hill, Edgmont, and Newtown Square PA office if you have any questions.

Dr. Carpinello and Dr. Jarosh-Wolfe and our team at Carpinello Orthodontics hope this information helps you!

Brushing with Braces: How to Keep a Clean Mouth

December 1st, 2017

A clean mouth is a happy mouth. And when Dr. Carpinello and Dr. Jarosh-Wolfe and our staff see you have a clean mouth, we are happy too. Of course, all of this should make you happy because you’re the one preventing sneaky little food bits from getting trapped under the wires of your braces.

Still, you need to be thorough with your brushing. When you have braces, you’re playing a game of hide-and-go-seek with everything you eat. Here are five tips to keep your mouth (and us) happy.

  1. How is brushing with braces like geometry? It’s all about the angles. Brush the tops of your teeth and braces with your brush angled down. Brush the bottom of your teeth with the brush angled up. Pointy brushes, aka interproximal brushes, are good for reaching the tiny spots around braces.
  2. Brush after every meal. If those sneaky little food bits hide in your mouth for very long, they’ll turn into plaque. And plaque is a sign of a very unhappy mouth.
  3. Brush one tooth at a time for at least ten seconds, and pay close attention to the spots where your braces touch your teeth.
  4. Fluoride is your new BFF. Make sure your toothpaste and mouthwash contain this cavity-fighting ingredient.
  5. Braces are no excuse not to floss. In fact, saying you can’t floss because you have braces is like saying the dog ate your homework. Dr. Carpinello and Dr. Jarosh-Wolfe and our staff, like your geometry teacher, aren’t going to buy it. Be sure to floss after every meal.